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Stephen Fitzpatrick Auction

Stephen Fitzpatrick Auction

29-01-2022 11:00 am -2:00 pm
Hilltown Farmers Market

Hilltown Farmers Market

06-02-2022 11:00 am -2:00 pm
Blast from the Past Vintage Run

Blast from the Past Vintage Run

20-02-2022 12:00 pm
£10.00
Hilltown Farmers Market

Hilltown Farmers Market

06-03-2022 11:00 am -2:00 pm
Sustaining and Building Cross Border Co-Operation and Trade

Sustaining and Building Cross Border Co-Operation and Trade

09-03-2022 9:00 am -1:00 pm
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Foster and Allen

Foster and Allen

16-03-2022 8:00 pm -10:30 pm
Stephen Fitzpatrick Auction

Stephen Fitzpatrick Auction

26-03-2022 11:00 am -2:00 pm
Hilltown Farmers Market

Hilltown Farmers Market

03-04-2022 11:00 am -2:00 pm
Stephen Fitzpatrick Auction

Stephen Fitzpatrick Auction

30-04-2022 11:00 am -2:00 pm
Hilltown Farmers Market

Hilltown Farmers Market

01-05-2022 11:00 am -2:00 pm
Stephen Fitzpatrick Auction

Stephen Fitzpatrick Auction

28-05-2022 11:00 am -2:00 pm
Hilltown Farmers Market

Hilltown Farmers Market

05-06-2022 11:00 am -2:00 pm
Stephen Fitzpatrick Auction

Stephen Fitzpatrick Auction

25-06-2022 11:00 am -2:00 pm
Hilltown Farmers Market

Hilltown Farmers Market

03-07-2022 11:00 am -2:00 pm
Stephen Fitzpatrick Auction

Stephen Fitzpatrick Auction

30-07-2022 11:00 am -2:00 pm
Iúr Cinn Fleadh

Iúr Cinn Fleadh

25-08-2022 2:00 pm -11:55 pm
Iúr Cinn Fleadh

Iúr Cinn Fleadh

26-08-2022 2:00 pm -11:55 pm
Stephen Fitzpatrick Auction

Stephen Fitzpatrick Auction

27-08-2022 11:00 am -2:00 pm
Iúr Cinn Fleadh

Iúr Cinn Fleadh

27-08-2022 2:00 pm -11:55 pm
Iúr Cinn Fleadh

Iúr Cinn Fleadh

28-08-2022 2:00 pm -11:55 pm
Iúr Cinn Fleadh

Iúr Cinn Fleadh

29-08-2022 2:00 pm -11:55 pm
Stephen Fitzpatrick Auction

Stephen Fitzpatrick Auction

24-09-2022 11:00 am -2:00 pm
Stephen Fitzpatrick Auction

Stephen Fitzpatrick Auction

29-10-2022 11:00 am -2:00 pm
Stephen Fitzpatrick Auction

Stephen Fitzpatrick Auction

26-11-2022 11:00 am -2:00 pm
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Newry, Mourne and Down District Council plan to revisit their 2011 Newry City Masterplan with the aim of updating the document which is meant to be a blue print for the development of our city.

At next Monday nights, 8 November meeting of the Enterprise, Regeneration and Tourism Committee, Councilllors will be asked to approve a review and agree the necessary funding. The review is expected to cost £33,500 with the Strategic Investment Board contributing £25K and Council funding the balance. 

The report to be presented by Director of the ERT, Conor Mallon explains that the review is necessary in light of the number of actions that have been delivered and due to the proposed Newry regeneration plan. It also highlights the impact of covid, active travel, car parking, signage and the changes to retail that are impacting on our high streets on a near daily basis as issues that need to be considered.

The report stresses that "Consultation will be an important part of the process and will include key stakeholders that were involved in the 2011 Newry City Centre Masterplan as well as others that have emerged through the evolution of the Newry City Centre Regeneration programme."

Download the 2011 Masterplan here 

Masterplan Revisited

Newry.ie has revisited the 2011 Masterplan and in fact you can Download it below. Many of the big ideas are still 'pipe dreams' with very little progress made in the ten years since and indeed it's quite frustrating to see the same things being suggested over the years and not being implemented.

Progress has been made with public realm work in Hill Street and Monaghan Street while rennovation work has taken place at Daisy Hill Woods and at Victoria Lock.

Newry Canal - no progress

In 2011 the long term aim of reopening Newry Canal  was supposed to take 10-15 Years - So that gives us to 2026!

Reopening the Newry Canal to boat traffic would provide a major boost to the tourism economy of Northern Ireland. In Newry, challenges are posed by the number of low bridges across the water body. This project would therefore involve the implementation of locks and swing bridges to enable the passage of craft through the city centre.

Newry Canal reopening was one priority in the 2011 Masterplan. Photograph: Columba O'Hare/ Newry.ie
Newry Canal reopening was one priority in the 2011 Masterplan. Photograph: Columba O'Hare/ Newry.ie

As the first summit canal of the British Isles, the Newry Canal is a national, if not international heritage asset. Furthermore, it has grown in value as an ecological and recreational resource, with its towpath being recorded as one of Northern Ireland’s mostvisited attractions.

It is therefore of significant value to the city of Newry to support proposals to reopen the Newry Canal to boat traffic. This would involve the reconnection of Lough Neagh with Carlingford Lough, thereby reinstating a major connection in the growing network of navigable waterways across Ireland and Europe.

Benefits to Newry and its city centre would be widespread. An influx of visitors using the canal would bring additional economic activity to the city centre. As the largest settlement along its route, it would particularly benefit Newry’s hospitality and retail sectors, adding a surge of people along its length.

The passage of boats and use of city centre locks would also create a spectacle in the heart of Newry, being itself an attraction to visitors and locals alike. Work to the canal would also include refurbishment of its towpath, thereby enhancing its suitability for walkers, runners and cyclists.

The phased delivery of this project would require significant allocations of funding, drawn from a number of different sources. Yet its projected benefits and international significance as a piece of tourism infrastructure, means that opening up of the Newry Canal should be capable of attracting central and European government funding.

Newry Low Carbon City - Progress unknown

This was the Council's vision in 2011:

“A smart city in which citizens, business and government sustainably live, work and interact, through delivery of integrated, low carbon products and services.”

Southern Relief Road - Some Progress - It was suggested that this project would be of direct benefit to "major city developments such as the Albert Basin" but a non opening bridge as part of it could ruin Newry City instead of regenerating it! This medium term proposal was supposed to take 5-10 years!

Congestion levels in Newry City Centre are a major cause for concern and risk seriously stemming its ability to develop as a more prosperous city centre. A key strategic project to alleviate this situation is the Southern Relief Road.

The Southern Relief Road is an established proposal to link the Warrenpoint Road with the A1 bypass via a bridge across the Clanrye River, south of the city centre. In the 2009 feasibility report produced to explore the viability of this proposal, it was found that whilst environmental and engineering challenges would be presented, this link would deliver “significant economic benefits” to the City Centre.

Delivery of this project should be explored through public private partnership, being of direct benefit to Warrenpoint Port and major city developments such as the Albert Basin.

Newry Super Greenway - Some progress - The Carlingford Lough Greenway has produced an incredible facility for Newry. We are still waiting for a linkage between Canal and Greenway but there is some potential work in progress on that.

The existence of the Newry Canal and Clanrye River running through the centre of Newry makes it uniquely suited to a comprehensive network of foot and cycle paths. These paths or Greenways present a real opportunity to link the majority of Newry’s neighbourhoods with one another and with the city centre.

The benefits of such a system would be considerable. It would encourage many more people in the city to walk or cycle to and from the city centre thereby reducing road congestion, improving air quality and greatly contributing to the health and fitness of the city’s population.

Delivery of such a project is well suited to an incremental process, gradually extending and upgrading existing connections over time.

Waterfront: Creating a world class, city centre waterfront - Some progress with the Merchants Quay walkway but otherwise nothing.

The Clanrye River and Newry Canal present an exceptional opportunity for the city. Together, these watercourses create a focal point to the city centre that is truly unique. The Masterplan proposes a comprehensive waterfront project to fully capitalise upon this asset, with the goal of realising substantial social, economic and environmental benefits for Newry and its centre. Newry Waterfront will span from Sugar Island in the north to Albert Basin in the south and include all buildings located along Merchant’s Quay and the Mall and all open space located between them.

The proposed Waterfront would be realised by the phased delivery of four complementary projects. Firstly, a coordinated River Clean Up involving statutory agencies and voluntary bodies. Secondly, establishing a detailed plan for the entire area and comprehensive wall-to-wall redesign of the space between its buildings. Thirdly, the implementation of a weir to maintain water levels along the Clanrye River. And finally, the opening up of the Newry Canal to boat traffic, as part of the national connection between Lough Neagh and Carlingford Lough.

Sugar Island - Nurturing an unique, creative quarter - No physical progress but some planning for new Theatre at Sean Hollywood Arts Centre!

The very name Sugar Island conjures up an exoticism, with strong roots in the merchant history of Newry. The island is an important gateway to the City Centre from the north and home to key civic buildings such as the Town Hall, Arts Centre and nearby Court House. However, its identity has been obscured by vacant sites, inappropriate development and a dominance of vehicles. Through the masterplan, it is therefore proposed to help Sugar Island rediscover its special identity through a series of projects, building on the success of the recently implemented Canal Street public realm.

Four Parks - Establishing a new network of city parks - No progress. Plans for a public park at the Albert Basin were agreed in 2017 but no progress of note made since.

The Albert Basin lies derelict. Photograph: Columba O'Hare/ Newry.ie
The Albert Basin lies derelict. Photograph: Columba O'Hare/ Newry.ie

Whilst analysis highlighted a lack of green open space in the City Centre, aerial photography clearly shows that green space does exist in relative proximity. The Masterplan proposes improved linkages and coordinated enhancements to the three parks of Heather Park, Kilmorey Park and The Rocks, plus the creation a new, larger public park as part of the redeveloped grounds of the former Abbey Grammar School. Designed and managed together with the input of local residents, these spaces present an excellent opportunity to enhance green open space provision for Newry City Centre.

Abbey Way Streetscape - No real progress. A few plants added.

Abbey Way is a four lane dual carriageway that connects the north of Newry with the south and west. It was built in the 1960’s to bypass Hill Street and to this day serves an important route for traffic accessing the city centre and passing through to and from Warrenpoint and Kilkeel.

Unfortunately for Newry, the town paid a heavy toll for the construction of this route, which involved the whole scale demolitionof its medieval street layout (see historical plan below). Today the route severs east / west pedestrian connections, particularlywhere the two carriageways are split across different levels. This barrier impacts on the ability of residents to access the centre byfoot, whilst also limiting the development potential of areas to the east.

In the short to medium term, scope exists to improve the route through environmental improvement measures, such as treeplanting and by improved surface crossing points. Yet the long term goal for Abbey Way should be a comprehensive redesign, turning it from a dual carriageway into a city centre street. This would become viable in conjunction with city wide traffic reduction proposals in Chapter 5. A faithful recreation of the narrow medieval streets that once existed there would be impractical.

However, scope exists to establish a broad street with frontage to either side, well proportioned footpaths, crossing points and street trees. Benefits would include far greater east/west connectivity and a much more appropriate setting for historic buildings such as the Castle and Cathedral.

Daisy Hill Hospital Extension - No progress although the new Civic Centre/ Council Office proposals for Newry are never far from our attention.

Daisy Hill is the region’s main general hospital, serving a wide catchment area and employing many local residents. Its existence in Newry is very important for the city, which must continue to support its needs for growth and development. However, the high-rise building is situated on a restricted site, meaning it has little scope for expansion. This is exacerbated by limited space for car parking, impacting upon surrounding residential areas.

Next door to the Hospital on Monaghan Row are the main offices of Newry & Mourne District Council. Like the hospital, thecouncil offices are hemmed in on a relatively small site for its needs. The building, both inside and out has become dated, with animpractical internal layout. Furthermore, the site is too small to accommodate all council functions, resulting in a spread of offices between this site and equally dated Greenbank Industrial Estate.

It is therefore proposed to consolidate both offices of Newry and Mourne District Council in a purpose built city centre facility. A number of potential locations exist for this building including the Albert Basin (see page 54) and the Abbey Grounds (see page 42). This would result in the Monaghan Row site being released for expansion of the Daisy Hill Hospital.

Albert Basin: Establishing a flagship city quarter - No progress. In most instances that's a relief as proposals majored on using it as a development site but it did also suggest there should be "Reanimation of the water through the construction of a marina and mooring facilities."

Whilst a clear opportunity exits for the ‘traditional’ waterfront uses of apartments, offices and bars, the site should also accommodate civic amenities, such as the relocated offices of Newry and Mourne District Council.

 

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